Interview with David Benioff and D.B. Weiss

  • In the ten episodes you've created this season, what are some of your favorite parts?

  • You mean the things that we've done very, very well? [laughs] I'd say that we did a good job of finding some extremely talented people to create these characters onscreen. And every time I see them doing things that are better than I ever could have envisioned them being, I give us a little pat on the back for choosing those people.

  • Was there any small detail of that moment that stands out to you?

  • A lot of it comes down to Sean's face in those final moments. When he looks out to the statue of Baelor, and Arya's not there anymore, that's a great moment. He hopes that Yoren has gotten to her and that she's safe. But at the same time, it was the one face he could look out at that would look back with love. Now, he's just facing a crowd of angry strangers who are cursing him, calling him a traitor and throwing things at him. Then he ducks his head down, and that shot there is one of my favorite shots of the whole season. It's just the back of his head and neck. There's not much to it, but to me it's one of the most emotional two seconds of the entire season.

  • Did you feel a lot of pressure to get the dragons exactly right at the end of episode 10?

  • It was actually a lot of fun for us, because whose inner 12-year-old doesn't want to build dragons from the ground up? We had some really talented people working with us to make them into a reality. We started out with visual reference that we'd pulled together from other movie dragons that we and George [R.R. Martin, the author of the books series ?Game of Thrones' is based on] both found to be believable and influential. We started with a lot of George's ideas about dragons, because George has definitely spent more time thinking about dragons than anyone I've ever met. He has a lot of very well thought-out and logical notions of what a dragon should and should not be. So we threw that into the mix and then threw in a lot of visual reference from the animal world: prehistoric animals, reptiles, bats, birds ... We put together a giant file of notes and images, then the team took those and modeled them into something organic that's hopefully really effective for people.

  • Is there any sense of relief that you don't have to build an entire world from scratch for Season 2?

  • It's good we don't have to build the stuff we've already built. But there are approximately six or seven new worlds that we have to build from scratch. So...we're feeling a huge sense of excitement, let's say, about being able to go forward and do it all over again in what is hopefully an even more effective expansion of the world we've already created.

  • Now that Season 1 is officially over, what can fans look forward to in the next installment?

  • A lot of Season 1 is about characters figuring out who they are and what they're after. So in Season 2, you see them starting to fulfill their destinies. Daenerys Targaryen started out Season 1 as this timid little girl and ends it as a warrior queen. Now she's intent on winning back what's rightfully hers - the Seven Kingdoms. Jon Snow is marching north with the Night's Watch to find out what the hell is going on up there and unravel those mysteries. His brother Robb is now the King of the North, and he's on a mission of vengeance to march south and avenge his father's death.

  • Do the two of you gravitate toward different characters that you're fans of or like to write for?

  • I like to think of myself as a Mord the jailer type.

  • You guys have been friends since college and have been involved with this series for years - how does it feel to be at the end of your first season?

  • It feels good ... It was just one of those things that as it got closer and closer to becoming reality, it became terrifying. And if it went away, there would never be anything quite like it again.