Please update your flash player...

Resources

Remember the Triangle Fire Coalition

The mission of the Triangle Fire Coalition is to create a living memorial to remember not only the people who died but the powerful social conscience and action that their deaths inspired. The site features an Open Archive where users can share document, image, audio or video that relates to the Triangle Fire, and information about commemoration events and activities including the official 100th Anniversary Commemoration organized by Workers United.

Cornell University - ILR School - Kheel Center The Triangle Fire Archive

Housed at the Kheel Center, this archive includes original documents, oral histories, and photographs documenting tragedy. The site also includes audio recordings of first-hand accounts from survivors and a selected bibliography.

Adelphi Triangle Factory Fire Remembrance Project

Co-organized with by the Education and Labor Collaborative at Adelphi, this year-long commemoration of the Triangle Factory Fire features an exhibition, theater project, and community blog.

Grey Art Gallery - Art Memory Place: The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire

Located in the same building complex where the fire took place, this exhibition co-curated by graduate students in NYU's Programs in Museum Studies explores both historic and contemporary efforts to document the tragedy.

International Labor Rights Forum

Sweatshops and factory fires are not just a tragedy of the past. In recent years a series of fires in factories producing clothing for the U.S. market have killed hundreds of workers in Bangladesh. Visit sweatfree.org/trianglefire to learn about upcoming events with workers from Bangladesh and to take action on urgent action alerts to support the just and humane treatment of workers worldwide.

Also visit: Sweatfree communities to learn more.

Occupational Safety & Health Administration

OSHA's mission is to ensure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance. Many of these present day standards are the result of reforms made in the aftermath of the Triangle Factory Fire. To learn more about some of these reforms, view this infographic from SEIU.

READING

The New York City Triangle Factory Fire by Leigh Benin, Rob Linne, Adrienne Sosin, Joel Sosinsky, HBO Documentary Films, 2011

Triangle: The Fire That Changed America by David von Drehle, 2008

No Sweat: Fashion, Free Trade, and the Rights of Garment Workers, by Andrew Ross, 1997

The Triangle Fire by Leon Stein, 1962

Preliminary Report of the Factory Investigating Commission, State of New York, 1912

Fire: Best American Essays, 2002, page numbers 165 - 186 (October, 2002) by Amy Kolen

U.S. LEGISLATION

Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011 - HR 1

This act makes appropriations for departments and agencies of the Government for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2011, and for other purposes. According to the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), HR 1 will reduce OSHA funding "to Fiscal Year 2004 funding levels."

Occupational Safety and Health Act (1970)

The main goal of OSHA is to ensure that employers provide employees with an environment free from recognized hazards, such as exposure to toxic chemicals, excessive noise levels, mechanical dangers, heat or cold stress, or unsanitary conditions.'

Fair Labor Standards Act (1938)

This law established minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping, and youth employment standards affecting employees in the private sector and in Federal, State, and local governments.'

National Labor Relations Act (1935)

This law established the right of workers to bargain collectively, defined unfair labor practices, and created the National Labor Relations Board to oversee the process of unionizing, and investigate and protect workers from unfair labor practices.

Triangle: Remembering The Fire