Please update your flash player...

Synopsis

THE TSUNAMI AND THE CHERRY BLOSSOM is a stunning visual poem about the ephemeral nature of life, and the healing power of Japan's most beloved flower. The nation is transfixed by cherry blossom season, which runs from late March through April, with many people tracking the blossoms' short lifecycle and attending "hanami," or viewing parties, with family and friends.

Walker had originally planned to visit Japan to make a film about cherry-blossom season, but on March 11, 2011, while she was making final preparations for her trip, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck, triggering tsunami waves of up to 133 feet on Japan's northeastern coast. Initially unsure whether to continue, she flew to Tokyo with a small film crew and headed north to the Tohuku region, where she captured both the utter devastation and stoic resolve of survivors, many of whom had lost family members and friends.

THE TSUNAMI AND THE CHERRY BLOSSOM opens with harrowing home-video footage, shot from a hill, of a huge wave destroying the town below. A month later, a young woman stands on the same hill, remembering how she "watch[ed] people being consumed by the tsunami." An older man tells how he tried and failed to save his oldest friend, proclaiming, "I don't want a house. I don't want clothes. I don't want anything. I just want his life back."

Others tell their stories of survival, escaping in their slippers and seeing whole houses rush toward them on a wave of black water. One couple living at a community center returns to the ruins of their house, hoping to rebuild. Their town is within the 30km exclusion zone around the Fukushima power plant, and many people wear cotton masks as protection from radiation.

Amidst the despair in the days following the tsunami comes a glimmer of hope in "sakura" (cherry blossom), a harbinger of spring in Japan and a national symbol of renewal. One man explains how the cherry blossom reflects the Japanese character, saying, "Each flower is tiny, and you can't see one individually. But it's beautiful when you see lots of flowers together. Japanese people see themselves that way too."

Out of respect for the victims, many viewing parties were cancelled this year, but people still visit the blossoms and take pictures. A man who lost his house shows where new plant shoots have sprouted on the beach, commenting that if plants can hang in there, humans can too. A young woman looking at the cleanup and construction adds, "Every year that the trees bloom, they'll give us the courage to keep going."

In addition to its Oscar® nomination, THE TSUNAMI AND THE CHERRY BLOSSOM received the Jury Prize in Short Filmmaking at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival and was an official selection at the Toronto International Film Festival, the Hamptons International Film Festival and BFI London.

For more information on the documentary, please visit: Facebook: facebook.com/hbodocs; and Twitter: @HBODocs #tsunamiblossom.

THE TSUNAMI AND THE CHERRY BLOSSOM was directed by Lucy Walker; executive producers, Tim Case and Charles V. Salice; producers, Kira Carstensen and Lucy Walker; director of photography, Aaron Phillips; editor, Aki Mizutani; music by Moby.

Boat on river

The Tsunami & The Cherry Blossom

Monday, July 16 at 10 PM

Related Media

`
Preview promo-3093095-30

video