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synopsis

Crude Awakening

More than 200 million gallons of oil surged into the Gulf of Mexico in 2010.  To combat the worst environmental disaster in American history, BP and the Coast Guard dumped nearly 2 million gallons of a chemical dispersant called Corexit into the Gulf.  But instead of helping clean up the spill, Corexit made things worse. The seafood industry is decimated, and clean-up workers have developed debilitating respiratory and central nervous-system problems, along with skin rashes. Scientific studies have proven that Corexit exposure kills cells in the human airway, and makes oil 52 times more toxic to the environment.  Four years later, mass quantities of oil still wash ashore, and our government has done nothing to ban this dangerous chemical dispersant. Shane Smith went to Louisiana to report on the lasting effects of the BP oil spill.

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The Enemy of My Enemy

Yemen, the fractured state in the Arabian peninsula, is at the top of the worry list for President Obama's national security team, and the rise of Al Qaeda there is only half the reason why. The Yemeni government, an American ally, has lost so much control over the years that many U.S. officials consider Yemen a failed state, declaring it the "next Afghanistan." The real trouble is a current threat posed by the little-known Houthi rebel movement in the north of the country - a grassroots army, allegedly funded by Iran, that has never granted access to any other Western film crew before.  Ben Anderson went deep into Houthi-controlled territory to learn about the group that's fighting, and beating, Al Qaeda in the east, Saudi Arabia in the north, and Yemen's central government in the south.

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19: Crude Awakening and The Enemy of My Enemy