Please update your flash player...

Bio

Guitarists ranging from Eric Clapton and Mike Bloomfield, to Peter Green, Jeff Beck and Carlos Santana have all acknowledged their debt to Freddie King (1934-1976), the "Texas Cannonball."  His '60s classics, "Have You Ever Loved A Woman," "Hide Away," "You've Got To Love Her With A Feeling" and "The Stumble" are part of the DNA of modern electric blues.  Born in Texas, young Freddie arrived in Chicago with his family in 1950, a perfect moment to start learning from Muddy Waters, Little Walter, Jimmy Rogers and all of the legendary post-war bluesmen.  Over the next ten years, as the First Great blues revival took shape, Freddie developed a style all his own.  In 1961, he miraculously charted six R&B Top 30 hits on the King/Federal label that were heard from coast-to-coast and were profoundly influential on both sides of the Atlantic.  Three covers are indelibly etched: "Hideaway" featuring Clapton (on John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, the Beano' LP of 1966), "The Stumble" and "Someday, After Awhile (You'll Be Sorry)" (both featuring Green, on Mayall's A Hard Road, '67) and "Have You Ever Loved A Woman" (a staple for Clapton ever since the first Derek & the Dominos album).  Freddie King thrived on rock, jazz and blues scenes and at festivals starting in the late '60s and '70s, even getting name-checked by Grand Funk Railroad on "We're An American Band" ("Up all night with Freddie King/ I got to tell you, poker's his thing").  Right up through his death, all too soon at age 42, Freddie influenced Stevie Ray and Jimmie Vaughan, and the next generation of disciples who would take electric blues into the '80s, '90s and beyond.

For more information on Freddie King, visit RockHall.com.

Freddie King

Freddie King

Early Influence