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Synopsis

The Transformation of Tyson

Once dubbed "the baddest man on the planet," and a fearsome presence in and out of the ring, former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson enjoyed massive success as a knockout artist, reportedly earning more than $300 million in purses, all of which is gone. Following memorable roles in Hollywood films, including the "Hangover" franchise, the 46-year-old has reinvented himself yet again. Tyson has taken his talents to the stage as the star of a one-man show full of anger, humor and tears. In this REAL SPORTS/Sports Illustrated collaboration, correspondent Bernard Goldberg goes one-on-one with the pugilist as he sets off on a North American tour and uncovers an introspective side of Mike Tyson few have seen before.

Gabrielle Ludwig

One of the most polarizing players in women's college basketball today, 51-year-old Gabrielle Ludwig towers above the competition at six feet, six inches. The last time Ludwig competed in college basketball more than 30 years ago, she was playing on a men's team, as Robert Ludwig. The Desert Storm veteran underwent sex reassignment surgery last summer, reenrolled in college and has become the only known person to play college ball as both a man and a woman. Ludwig sits down with host Bryant Gumbel to discuss becoming the person she always believed she was and explains how basketball helped her through the hardest times.

Pushing the Limits

Millions tuned in to the snowmobile freestyle finals of the 2013 Winter X-Games and witnessed the accident that led to the tragic death of 25-year-old Caleb Moore. As the sport grows, so do the money and attention, along with the danger. In recent years, high-flying events such as snowboarding and skiing have resulted in brutal injury and even death. While the very premise of extreme sports is to test the limits, REAL SPORTS' investigative team explores how far is too far as correspondent Jon Frankel asks the question: Have extreme sports gotten too extreme?

Being Lolo Jones

Prior to her quest for gold at the London Games, Lolo Jones captured headlines across the country in May 2012 when she told correspondent Mary Carillo that she was still a virgin at age 29. That moment of honesty only intensified the public's fascination with the beautiful, skilled hurdler who overcame a hardscrabble past and tough luck to make her Olympic debut at the 2008 Beijing Games. In this all-new REAL SPORTS segment, the 30-year-old reconnects with Carillo to talk about the 2012 London Games, where she failed to win a medal, and her new foray into bobsledding. Jones joined the U.S. national bobsled team shortly after London and is now vying for an opportunity to represent the U.S. at the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, Russia.

192: March 19, 2013