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Synopsis

Sampat Pal is the leader of the Gulabi Gang (aka the Pink Gang), a vigilante group of women in Northern India distinguished by their distinctive bright pink saris.  Like many other women, Pal was married as a young girl into a family that made her work hard and often beat her.  Unlike most other Indian women, she overcame her problems to become an outspoken, self-described "messiah" for women.

            Though domestic abuse is illegal in India, tradition and the caste system are steadfastly upheld by many, especially in the rural areas where the Pink Gang operates.  By tradition, women are not allowed to live with their own parents once they are married, and are at the mercy of the husband's family.  If a woman comes from a lower caste, she is often not allowed to marry a man of higher rank.  Pal's strategy is to expose abusive husbands, in-laws and other offenders by settling family matters out in the open, turning the tables on those who did the damage.

           

Sempat walking down road

 Among the women who see her and the Pink Gang as their only hope are Rekha, a 14-year-old homeless "untouchable" (the lowest caste, whose members are now known as Dalits) who is three months pregnant and unable to marry her unborn child's father because of her low caste, and 15-year-old Renu, whose husband from an arranged marriage has abandoned her and whose father-in-law has been abusing her.

            Pal says, "Forget tradition.  Women won't suffer in silence.  They won't keep quiet any more."

            While PINK SARIS highlights Sampat Pal's strength and passion as a leader, as well as her unique way of resolving disputes, it also sheds light on her private troubles.  Her partner, Babuji, who has watched Pal change over the years, is less certain about her high-profile methods.

                   

Sempat comforting young girl

  Kim Longinotto, the world-renowned director of PINK SARIS, has won awards at festivals worldwide, including:  the World Cinema Jury Prize in Documentary at Sundance for "Rough Aunties," which aired on HBO2 in May 2010; a 2008 Peabody Award and two Cannes awards for "Sisters in Law"; and an Amnesty International DOEN Award at IDFA and Best Doc UK Spotlight at Hot Docs for "The Day I Will Never Forget," which premiered at Sundance in 2003 and debuted on CINEMAX that year.  The Museum of Modern Art honored her with a film retrospective of her body of work in 2009 and she received Hot Docs' Outstanding Achievement Award in 2010.

            HBO Documentary Films & Channel 4 present a Women Make Movies release of a production by Vixen Films & Ginger Productions; filmed & directed by Kim Longinotto, with Amber Latif and Girjashanker Vohra; editor, Ollie Huddleston; executive producers, Amber Ronowicz and Ed Stobart.  For Channel 4:  executive producer, Hamish Mykura.

Sempat crying

Pink Saris